Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


older | 1 | (Page 2) | 3 | 4 | .... | 8 | newer

    0 0

    Damien Broderick and Ben Goertzel (eds)

    From the publisher’s website: ‘Psi’ is the term used by researchers for a variety of demonstrable but elusive psychic phenomena. This collection of essays provides a detailed survey of the evidence for psi at the level of scientific examination.

    Key features of apparent psi phenomena are reviewed, including precognition and remote perception (knowledge of future or distant events that cannot be inferred from present information), presentiment (physiological responses to stimuli that have not yet occurred), the effects of human emotions on globally dispersed machines, the possible impact of local sidereal time on psi performance, and the familiar feeling of knowing who is calling on the phone.

    Special attention is given to those phenomena that make it difficult for scientists to get a clear understanding of psi. The body of psi research, while complex and frustrating, is shown to contain sufficiently compelling positive evidence to convince the rational open-minded observer that psi is real, and that one or more physical processes probably underlie observed psi phenomena.

    A review by Robert Charman will appear in the Journal of the Society for Psychical Research.

    Evidence for Psi. McFarland, November 2014. ISBN-13: 978-0786478286

    0 0

    Dr Caroline Watt, a founder member of the Koestler Parapsychology Unit, has compiled a list of publications that have emanated from the Unit to celebrate the thirtieth anniversary of the establishment of the Koestler Chair of Parapsychology (the KPU's forerunner) under the late Professor Robert L Morris.

    Dr Caroline Watt, a founder member of the Koestler Parapsychology Unit, has compiled a list of publications that have emanated from the Unit to celebrate the thirtieth anniversary of the establishment of the Koestler Chair of Parapsychology (the KPU's forerunner) under the late Professor Robert L Morris.

    Many of the publications listed have links to PDFs, including some that have appeared in the Journal of the Society for Psychical Research.  Dr Watt's blog post with a link to the list can be found here:

    https://koestlerunit.wordpress.com/2015/07/20/30-years-of-kpu-publications/


    0 0

    Eben Alexander

    From the author’s website: Near-death experiences, or NDEs, are controversial. Thousands of people have had them, but many in the scientific community have argued that they are impossible. Dr. Eben Alexander was one of those people.  A highly trained neurosurgeon who had operated on thousands of brains in the course of his career, Alexander knew that what people of faith call the “soul” is really a product of brain chemistry. NDEs, he would have been the first to explain, might feel real to the people having them, but in truth they are simply fantasies produced by brains under extreme stress.  Then came the day when Dr. Alexander’s own brain was attacked by an extremely rare illness. The part of the brain that controls thought and emotion – and in essence makes us human – shut down completely. For seven days Alexander lay in a hospital bed in a deep coma.  Then, as his doctors weighed the possibility of stopping treatment, Alexander’s eyes popped open. He had come back.

    Tom Ruffles

    Released in late 2012, Eben Alexander’s Proof of Heaven garnered an enormous amount of attention, including making the cover of Newsweek, being discussed on the Oprah Winfrey Show, and picking up a cover endorsement from the doyen of near-death experience (NDE) research Raymond Moody which declares that ‘Dr Eben Alexander’s near-death experience is the most astounding I have heard in more than four decades of studying this phenomenon...’  As a result of all the exposure it has now sold millions of copies, as indicated by the cover announcement ‘The New York Times bestseller’.  While that attention has waned, the questions surrounding the author and his remarkable story have grown.

    As Alexander, a neurosurgeon, tells it, in November 2008 he fell prey to a devastating strain of E. coli bacterial meningitis that left him in a coma for seven days, his cortex completely shut down.  Against all medical prognostications he survived this massive assault on his brain that by rights should have led to death or a vegetative state, but he came back with a bizarre description of where he had been during the time his body lay helpless in an intensive care unit.  While the doctors were battling to save his life against what seemed hopeless odds, and his family were preparing themselves for what they believed was the inevitable, Alexander himself was, he says, undertaking a hyper-real journey into the afterlife.

    First there was what he terms ‘the Realm of the Earthworm’s-Eye View’, a place of darkness that he describes in a chapter appropriately titled ‘Underworld’.  Then he was transported to what he calls ‘The Gateway’, filled with light, beautiful sounds, and with wonderful butterflies flitting around.  Riding on one of the butterflies (scale being meaningless in this place) was a beautiful young woman who gave him a message of hope.  Finally there was ‘The Core’, where Alexander understood that God (or ‘Om’, a word he uses interchangeably but which does not have the same associations as the term God), the omniscient creator, is real, and that we are loved unconditionally.  He learns lessons which, he says, will take a lifetime to unpack and digest, and presumably promote in subsequent books.  With a brief side-trip back to the Realm of the Earthworm’s-Eye View he wakes up just as his doctors are debating whether to switch off his life support.  The prime lessons he learned may not have been original, but for him they were profound: that everything in the universe is connected, and the force that binds is Love.  After his return he saw a photograph of a deceased sister he had never met (he was adopted) and recognised her as the person who had ridden a butterfly.

    The first thing to say is that this is not a technical book written for the specialist community of NDE researchers.  Nor does it engage with the NDE literature, despite a six-page reading list.  It is a popular, not an academic volume, and it is doubtful it would have sold as well if it had been.  That is fine as long as it is rigorous enough to sustain the claims made in it, but its degree of rigour is where the issues start.  The book has been hugely controversial, polarising readers into opposing camps.  The detractors are spearheaded by Luke Dittrich in a 2013 Esquire feature called ‘The Prophet’.  Dittrich takes issue with a number of details in the book, and also attacks Alexander on a professional level.  The implications of the article’s biographical exposé are that Alexander lacks sufficient focus and attention to detail to be a first-rate doctor, is prone to interpersonal problems with his superiors, and the theme emerges of him altering the historical record in his surgical practice to conform to the narrative he wants to promote: he did it during a number of malpractice suits according to Dittrich, and the implication is that he is doing the same with this book.  Dittrich paints a picture of a troubled professional life, Alexander having failed to live up to his adoptive father’s standards (his father was also a neurosurgeon).  His natural father was a high achiever too, and Alexander implies in the book that he has suffered from self-esteem problems.

    While Dittrich’s lengthy critique was disputed by Alexander, the subtext of the controversy being whether or not Alexander could be trusted, it is important because we have to rely on Alexander’s account of his ‘journey into the afterlife’ with no independent verification, and Dittrich argues that Alexander is unreliable.  The book’s success, Dittrich continues, pulled Alexander out of a financial hole caused by long periods of unemployment resulting from work problems.  On the other hand, Alexander’s contention is that despite travails stemming from his personal history (he does mention a struggle with alcohol, though not the malpractice issues) he is still a fine surgeon and a truthful witness.  Trying to square both sides simply raises uncertainty about the veracity of what Alexander has said and what his motives may have been for saying it.  He seems happy to sacrifice precision for dramatic licence, but his willingness to do so leaves open the issue of where that licence ends and strict accuracy begins.  It is one of those books, marketed as nonfiction, which raises doubts as to the amount of fiction it might contain.

    The debate seems to have got hung up on minor elements, such as whether Alexander had a tube down his throat which would have prevented him shouting out ‘God help me!’, as he said he did, or whether there could have been a rainbow as he regained consciousness – he and his family say there was, his detractors counter that meteorological records indicate there could not have been.  Of course, if he can embroider the small things, he can do so with bigger things, but such aspects are of less importance than the key issue of whether the condition of Alexander’s brain during coma precluded the claimed experience.  One significant discrepancy is Dittrich’s discovery that Alexander’s coma was not caused by the infection, rather it was medically induced, which is not how Alexander depicts the course of events, and is frankly less dramatic.  According to one of the doctors Dittrich spoke to, Alexander’s brain was active throughout his ordeal; he was ‘conscious but delirious’.  That doesn’t seem to square with a medically-induced coma either, but whichever is the case, conscious or unconscious, this is a long way from a complete lack of cortical activity.

    In an appendix Alexander lists several alternatives that might still explain his NDE, but dismisses them all as they founder on him having had a completely inert cortex, and any activity in the lower brain regions would not have been sufficient, considering its richness.  But coma is a long way from a case like Pam Reynolds’, say, where the blood was drained from her head and her brain activity could be carefully monitored.  Alexander cannot reasonably aver that all brain function had ceased on the basis of occasional scans.  It seems odd that he uses his scientific credentials to buttress his contention that he visited heaven, yet as a scientist he does not adopt the parsimonious explanation that he was hallucinating but assumes that what he encountered possessed an external reality.  He has jumped to the conclusion that he was vouchsafed a vision of heaven for no other reason than it felt profound to him, but it is conjecture that his ‘trip’ coincided with a lack of cortical activity.  Even if his cortex did shut down completely, and that has not been demonstrated beyond doubt, his trip could have been an hallucination occurring after the resumption of activity, possibly over a short period of time.

    Part of the problem is that Alexander stresses that words cannot do justice to what happened to him, which goes beyond language to a state in which to see is to know directly and without mediation.  The corollary is that his readers will not be convinced by what he says unless they are predisposed already to accept that he visited heaven and met his sister (he recounts the irony of trying to convince colleagues who reacted in much the way he used to when his patients tried to tell him of similar experiences they had undergone).  To his critics’ argument that after such a severe trauma there is no guarantee that Alexander could produce a reliable record afterwards, his response is that while he is attempting to render in words something beyond language, such memories, which are not reliant on the brain, do not fade as conventional memory traces would; but this is speculation, without independent corroboration.  Psychical research has struggled since its inception for ways to isolate communications alleged to originate in the afterlife from other explanations, and demands a far higher level of evidence than can be found here.  Alexander may be right when he says he went to heaven, but to maintain he has proof is incorrect.  If this were submitted to a peer-reviewed journal it would be sent back saying that the data were insufficient to validate the conclusions.  Taking these caveats into consideration, the book’s title is a loaded one.

    Even if his account is taken to be broadly accurate, it is still a leap to the existence of God/Om and of heaven.  There is nothing here that contradicts standard Christian theology.  More to the point, there is nothing that contradicts Alexander’s own religious persuasion, and this reinforcement of existing beliefs will be a bonus for many of his followers.  One wonders how its reception would have been affected if Om had informed him that there is no God but Allah, and Muhammad is His messenger.  Yet despite the book’s trajectory feeling convenient, it is possible that Alexander has been maligned by critics, and that his journey happened in the way he said it happened, and supplies evidence for an afterlife (whether or not one wants to go further and characterise that as heaven presided over by a supreme being).  Alternatively it may be that he is a cynical charlatan with a money-making scheme to compensate for the loss of a medical career.  Or he may be honest but misguided, fantasising that his NDE – an atypical one as he concedes – has more meaning that it actually warrants, and happy to ignore small discrepancies in search of the big picture.

    His recovery from such an illness may have been miraculous (in either a loosely metaphorical or strictly theological manner), but whatever occurred during his time in the intensive care unit, there is nothing in his book that provides a definitive answer.  A reasonable conclusion is that Alexander has spun a little into a lot, and pushed his conclusions far past the point warranted by the evidence.  There is an assurance that makes the book superficially convincing, but its reluctance to acknowledge counter-arguments, and its omissions, generate doubt.  That may be why, although Universal Pictures quickly picked up the film rights to the book, nothing has been heard of a screen adaptation since.  Alexander comes over as superficially sincere, but there are too many questions raised to take what he says at face value, let alone as proof of heaven.

    Proof of Heaven. Piatkus, October 2012. ISBN-13: 978-0749958794

    read more


    0 0

    Jeffrey D. Lavoie

    From the publisher’s website: Christian mystic, astrologer, and spiritualist, Charles Carleton Massey (1838–1905) underwent an eclectic spiritual journey that resulted in a series of articles, letters, and booklets that have largely been neglected by modern society. Massey was a child of privilege formally trained as a barrister of law at the Westminster School and the son of the English Minister of Finance for India. He devoted his life to solving the metaphysical mysteries of existence leading him into the world of religious philosophy that placed him in the middle of a crossroads between Victorian science, religion, and philosophy. Beginning his journey as a Spiritualist, Massey continued on a course that brought him into the Theosophical Society, eventually becoming the founding president of its British branch, going through the ranks of the Society of Psychical Research and ultimately into his final role as a Christian mystic.

    A Search for Meaning in Victorian Religion. Lehigh University Press, November 2014. ISBN-13: 978-1611461848

    read more


    0 0

    A six-part BBC drama currently in production set in 1888, The Living and the Dead, has a character who investigates the paranormal for the SPR.

    A six-part BBC drama currently in production, The Living and the Dead, has a character who investigates the paranormal for the SPR.

    'Set in Somerset, England in 1888 The Living and the Dead focuses on a couple, played by Merlin star Morgan and Charlotte Spencer.

    'He is a gentleman farmer who is obsessed with proving the existence of the afterlife and spends his time investigating paranormal happenings with the backing of the Society for Psychical Research.'

    More information on the series can be found here:

    http://www.independent.ie/entertainment/television/tv-news/is-irish-actor-colin-morgan-poised-to-be-the-new-poldark-in-new-bbc-period-drama-31434538.html


    0 0

    Bernardo Kastrup

    From the publisher’s website: This book is a multi-faceted exploration and critique of the human condition as it is presently manifested. It addresses science and philosophy, explores the underlying nature of reality, the state of our society and culture, the influence of the mainstream media, the nature of free will and a number of other topics. Each of these examinations contributes an angle to an emerging idea gestalt that challenges present mainstream views and behaviors and offers a sane alternative. The book is organized as a series of short and self-contained essays, most of which can be read in under one hour.

    Brief Peeks Beyond. Iff Books, May 2015. ISBN-13: 978-1785350184

    read more


    0 0

    The delegate photograph taken during the very successful conference held in Greenwich in conjunction with the Parapsychological Association has been released.

    The delegate photograph taken during the very successful conference held in Greenwich in conjunction with the Parapsychological Association has been released.

     


    0 0

    SPR Council member Professor Chris Roe has been elected president of the Parapsychological Association.

    SPR Council member Professor Chris Roe has been elected president of the Parapsychological Association for 2015-17.

    Professor Roe is also editor of the Journal of the Society for Psychical Research.  He heads the Centre for the Study of Anomalous Psychological Processes at the University of Northampton.

    The full PA results are here:

    http://www.parapsych.org/articles/0/240/2015_election_results.aspx

    Further information on CSAPP is here:

    http://www.northampton.ac.uk/research/psychology/the-centre-for-the-study-of-anomalous-psychological-processes-csapp


    0 0
  • 08/20/15--02:14: New Headquarters for SPR
  • The SPR has moved offices. After over twenty years at Marloes Rd we have moved a short distance away in Kensington, London. There will inevitably be some disruption to services, but we will try to keep this to a minimum.

    We are pleased to announce that the SPR has moved to new headquarters. This is an exciting development about which we will have more to tell you about shortly.

    However, in the meantime, there will be some disruption to our operations while we finish fitting out our new offices and complete the move.

    Our telephone number and email address remain the same, but please forgive us if we are unable to respond as quickly as we would like. We hope to be back to normal office operations by the end of August.

    Unfortunately our library will remained closed for a longer period. We are making a great effort to preserve the period cabinetry of our former library and the restoration process and restocking will take some time. We hope that our library will be open for business by the end of September. 

    The new address is:

    1 Vernon Mews

    West Kensington

    London W14 0RL

    This is effective immediately. We to apologise for any inconvenience and we are looking forward to welcoming you to our new headquarters in the near future.


    0 0

    The Londonist website, which is devoted to promoting London, has an article on its website listing interesting London libraries. The first of these is that of the SPR.

    The Londonist website, which is devoted to promoting London, has an article on its website listing interesting London libraries, with a short write-up on each.  The first of these is that of the SPR.

    The article, dated 26 August 2015, is entitled 'What do Nazies, Stamps and Poltergeists Have in Common?', the link being that each has a library covering it in London

    The article can be found here:

    http://londonist.com/2015/08/london-s-lesser-known-libraries


    0 0

    Carmen Gleadow

    From the publisher’s website: In the second half of the twentieth century, a small number of doctors in the United States found themselves, quite independently from one another, undertaking what turned out to be pioneering research on unusual phenomena. The phenomena included claims of having lived before, or reincarnation, out-of-body and near-death experiences (OBEs and NDEs). These phenomena encompassed the three realms that, according to the Ancients, were inherent in human beings: body, mind and spirit. Their research opened up new fields of enquiry in medicine.

    The doctors and their original publications are known globally and include: Ian Stevenson, Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, Raymond A. Moody, Bruce Greyson, Michael Sabom, Kenneth Ring and Melvin Morse.  What prompted the researchers along the new paths were people’s accounts of a previous life; patients’ reported observations of resuscitation attempts by medical staff; and accounts of having gone some way into ‘the beyond’ while close to death. The researchers’ initial reaction to such reports ranged from surprise to bewilderment, even disbelief. Nevertheless, they listened to patients and started investigating the phenomena. This was no easy task, since their research took them well beyond the comfort zone of classical medical assumptions in which they had trained.

    Medical Pioneers. Parsons Porch, November 2014. ISBN-13: 978-0692335260

    read more


    0 0

    The latest issue of Psychic News (September 2015) carries an article by Lew Sutton on a presentation given at the recent SPR conference by Professor Chris Roe on mediumship research.

    The latest issue of Psychic News (September 2015) carries an article by Lew Sutton on a presentation given at the recent SPR conference by SPR Council member Professor Chris Roe.  It concerns a project which is being run at the Arthur Findlay College (Stansted Hall) and in which Professor Roe is involved.  His paper, co-authored with David Bruton, Chris Connelly, David Saunders and Rachel Evenden, is entitled 'Building Links Between Communities: Establishment of a Research Laboratory for the Scientific Study of Mediumship at the Arthur Findlay College‘.

    Funding for the project has been obtained from the SPR's Survival Research Fund, the Spiritualists' National Union and the University of Northampton (where Prof Roe is based) to equip a space at Stansted Hall in which mediumship experiments, including physiological monitoring of volunteers from among the College‘s students, can be conducted.

    There is also an article in the same issue on Sir Oliver Lodge and Raymond, who was killed on 14 September 1915, which refers to the SPR.

    Psychic News is available here:

    http://www.psychicnews.org.uk


    0 0

    Matt Cardin (ed.)

    From the publisher’s website: This fascinating work provides a complete overview of paranormal phenomena, including the beliefs, attitudes, and notable figures who have attempted to explain, defend, or debunk the mysteries behind the unknown.

    Recent interest in the paranormal as pop culture fodder belies its historical status as an important subject of cultural, philosophical, and scientific significance. This book traces the trajectory of paranormal studies from its early role as a serious academic and scientific topic studied by mainstream scientists and eminent scholars to its current popularity in books, film, and TV.

    This compelling reference work details the experiences, encounters, and ideas that make up this controversial field of study. The contributed entries examine the broad phenomena of the paranormal, addressing the history of scientific investigations along with its contemporary media depictions to illustrate the evolution of cultural attitudes about the paranormal. A selection of primary documents provides real-life accounts and contributions from noted experts that explore the full scope of themes from spiritualism to poltergeists to astrology. Accompanying images, timelines, quotations, and sidebars make the content come to life and encourage alternative explanations of these events.

    Features:

    Contains more than 120 factual entries as well as extensive excerpts from several primary documents in the area of the paranormal;

    Ghosts, Spirits, and Psychics. ABC-CLIO, July 2015. ISBN 978-1-61069-683-8

    read more


    0 0

    William J Hall

    From the publisher’s website: In this unprecedented work, the story of the 1974 Bridgeport, Connecticut poltergeist is at last revealed. A crowd of more than 2,000 onlookers gathered. National media reported jumping furniture, floating refrigerators, and attacking entities.  Decades after the publicity quieted, more than 40 hours of never-before-released interviews with police officers, firefighters, and others tell the story as it actually unfolded:

    Relive the experience, the terror, the rampant emotions, and the unexplainable events that took place in that house as they happened.  Have access to revealing excerpts from actual interviews, police reports, and rare documents.  Access unreleased audio, poltergeist sounds, and an old radio broadcast.

    Return to 1974 and feel the Lindley Street experience from the inside. Find out why it is deemed the haunting that should have brought the paranormal into mainstream science. For more info about the book and author, go to: www.worldsmosthauntedhouse.com 

    The World's Most Haunted House. New Page Books, August 2014. ISBN-13: 978-1601633378

    read more


    0 0

    The London Fortean Society is hosting a talk on Lewis Carroll in London on 26 November 2015. Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) was a member of the SPR.

    The London Fortean Society is hosting a talk on Lewis Carroll in London on Thursday 26 November 2015 at 7.45.  Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) was a member of the SPR.

    The meeting will be at the Bell, Middlesex St, London E1.

    A Facebook page has been set up for the event with a link to the ticketing website:

    https://www.facebook.com/events/1181998771828449/

     

    'Lewis Carroll, creator of Alice in Wonderland, was fascinated by the occult, magic and ghosts, and was a very early member of the Society for Psychical Research.

    'Jenny Woolf, author of the biography The Mystery Of Lewis Carroll, delves into this tangled web of Victorian creepiness, examines some of the weirder things that Carroll wrote, saw and read, considers medical reasons for the experiences he reports and casts light on the endless battle that raged in his own mind between religion, terror, humour, logic and the world of the unreal/'

     

    0 0

    As part of an event entitled ‘A Weekend of Commemoration and Hope for the Future: Stories of the First World War from Edgbaston and Ladywood’, there will be a day dedicated to Raymond Lodge at St George’s Church, Edgbaston, Birmingham, on Saturday 19 September 2015.

    As part of an event entitled ‘A Weekend of Commemoration and Hope for the Future: Stories of the First World War from Edgbaston and Ladywood’, there will be a day dedicated to Raymond Lodge at St George’s Church, Edgbaston, Birmingham, on Saturday 19 September 2015.

    It includes talks on ‘Sir Oliver Lodge; Mediumship, Séances and Survival’ and ‘Religion and Spiritualism during the First World War’.

    Sir Oliver Lodge was a prominent member of the SPR and its president 1901-3 and 1932.  His book Raymond (1916) is the most famous book dealing with ostensible communications from the afterlife to be published during the conflict.

    Details about the day can be found here:

     

    http://www.oliverlodge.org/raymond-a-day-of-commemoration-of-the-lodge-family-and-the-first-world-war/


    0 0

    Jeffrey Mishlove and Stephen E Braude discuss apparitions in the YouTube 'New Thinking Allowed' series.

    Jeffrey Mishlove and Stephen E Braude discuss apparitions in the YouTube 'New Thinking Allowed' series.  They refer to the SPR during their conversation.

    The video can be found here:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VD8BJBSz2Bg&feature=youtu.be


    0 0

    Edwin C. May and Sonali Bhatt Marwaha (eds.)

    From the publisher’s website: Anomalous cognition involves the acquisition of information emerging from a distant point in spacetime that is blocked from the usual sensory systems by distance, shielding or time. From 1975 to 1995, Edwin May was a scientist and then programme director for the U.S. government’s psychic espionage program, known as STAR GATE. With the closing of that program, research has continued at the Laboratories for Fundamental Research, in Palo Alto, in the areas of methodology and analysis, neurophysiological studies, personnel assessment and selection, operations research, the physics of anomalous cognition, and psychokinesis.

    The conclusions from this 35+ year research effort can be summarized as (1) ESP exists; (2) the gradient of Shannon entropy is the key factor influencing information transfer; (3) because of the innate nature of the ability, the phenomenon so far resists training for excellence (and replication studies will not yield results), and (4) evidence for psychokinesis (PK) is questionable.

    This book presents the state-of-the-art, with 26 key papers on research methods, physiological research, decision augmentation theory, entropy, other research, and research challenges.

    A review by Professor Donald J. West will appear in the Journal of the Society for Psychical Research.

    Anomalous Cognition. McFarland, July 2014. ISBN-13: 978-0786494583

    read more


    0 0

    The University of Northampton is advertising for a graduate teaching assistant, intended for someone with an undergraduate degree in Psychology or related discipline who would be willing to take on some general undergraduate teaching in Psychology while registered for a PhD in parapsychology or transpersonal psychology, with fees waived.

    The University of Northampton is advertising for a graduate teaching assistant, intended for someone with an undergraduate degree in Psychology or related discipline who would be willing to take on some general undergraduate teaching in Psychology while registered for a PhD in parapsychology or transpersonal psychology, with fees waived.

    The position is guaranteed for 3 years and the amount is comparable to ESRC grants, which should give sufficient time to complete the research aspect of the PhD.

    Further information can be found here:

    https://jobs.northampton.ac.uk/vacancy/graduate-teaching-assistant-in-psychology-05-fte-231872.html


    0 0

    OBE researcher Graham Nicholls has founded an organisation devoted to the study of out-of-body and near-death experiences.

    OBE researcher Graham Nicholls has founded an organisation devoted to the study of out-of-body and near-death experiences.

    The society's website, which is under construction, can be found here:

    http://www.outofbodyexperience.org.uk/


older | 1 | (Page 2) | 3 | 4 | .... | 8 | newer